American Waterfowl hunting is one of the greatest American traditions.  Of all types of hunting, Waterfowling is by far the greatest and most challenging hunting to be had.  It is the wild pagentery of 10's of millions of wild birds that breed in what is left of the most wild environments of North America.  Billions of dollars have been spend by sportsman to preserve and conserve these wildfowl in 3 countries, the US, Canada and Mexico.  Of these three, the most wild experience can be found in Alaska.


Just shooting game is not the goal of ardent Wildfowlers.  American Wildfowl are just not another game animal to be shot and claimed.  Waterfowling is a rich history that continues into the modern age.  It is a rare glimpse into our collective American past that pays honor to the great duck and goose hunting sportsman that came before us.  Many of the men that build America from the ground up were waterfowl hunters, both industrialist, workers and farmers had a shotgun in their hand come fall.


The pursuit of waterfowl is part of what made America great and what continues to make us great.  The hard won skills that make a good waterfowl hunter also make people that respect the land and waters that make our country exceptional on the world stage.


​There is more waterfowl art, published books, articles and history than any other type of hunting.  Brotherhood goes deep with wildfowlers, but yet, wildfowling at it's finest and best is a deeply personal experience.  It's not about how many trophy or different kinds of birds you can collect.  Decoy collecting in itself surpasses any of that, but wildfowling gives a deeper meaning to life, something real and traditional in a false and fake modern world.

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HUNTING Alaska waterfowl 

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Alaska is twice the size of Texas, the next largest state with half the roads of Delaware, one of the smallest states.  Just think about that for a minute.  Add in 10 to 12 million waterfowl and you can see that truly we are the last frontier of waterfowling in the world. 


Alaska has a small population of less than  735,000  people spread over millions of acres and thousands of square miles.  Even very much less of a population are duck and goose hunters.


Many of the largest, most productive and most remote waterfowl marshes are here for the hunting.   We have a two month season starting on September 1 and the weather can be milder than during the later seasons in much of North America.  Bag limits are liberal with 8 ducks of any species except Canvasback, 4 dark geese, 4 white front geese, 4 white geese and 2 cranes. 


Hunting Alaska waterfowl is a unique one of a kind sporting experience, not to be missed by gunners in the know.  Hunters here are the first to see truly wild birds coming off the vast tundra lakes, and likewise, young of the year birds will be seeing their first humans too.  Many of our birds head for the many private gunning clubs of California, where more of our birds are killed on opening day there, than all the waterfowl taken in Alaska the whole season.  Why wait for waterfowl that already civilized and "on the grain" taking it easy and loafing, living the easy life.


In Alaska, Wildfowling is all about the wild and cannot be experienced in most of North America any longer.  Most marsh/puddle duck shooting in most of the U.S. and Canada is done over harvested or flooded grain fields, which is just a back door method to hunt over illegal bait. In Alaska we hunt over wild waters and natural waterfowl feeding grounds not possible near or in agricultural regions of the rest of the continent.


It has been documented over the years by very experienced shooters that Alaska wildfowl, especially Mallards are very smart indeed.  They seem to retain the knowledge gained from their journey south each year and can be very blind shy and sporting.


The vastness of Alaska can be exceptionally awe inspiring and some of our marshes are some of the world's most classic and beautiful.  Imagine towering snow capped peaks with gemlike blue productive marshlands at their base located on streaming wildfowl flyways from far northern hinterlands seldom seen by humankind.


Our wealth is not just minerals, oil and fish, but butterball fat, wild ducks and geese making their remarkable migration across the breath of the greatest free, wild, pure and strong land on the planet. ALASKA.


Below you will find an ALASKA FLYWAY MAP.  This is a map of Alaska flyways I have developed over the years.  I have hunted the major flyways of Fairbanks and Bethel the most over a period of 38 years.  I cannot say for sure and most likely can anyone else that these flyways are completely correct.  There is a mixing of flyways anywhere and some birds, some years, will take different flyways for who knows what reasons, many times weather.  I feel that this is a general flyway guide compiled from talking with many hunters, Alaska fish and game biologist, birders and general observers.  I now hunt the Bethel flyway exclusively.  Most of my hunting is on the historic Matanuska Palmer Hay flats and surrounding areas.